Thursday, January 28th

Groundhog Day – February 2

The wish for a shorter winter lives strong in the hearts of many people, some years more than others. Cold, wind, snow, shoveling, wet mittens, winter boots … at one point or another, most of us call “Uncle”. Common sense or not, we pin our hopes on Groundhog Day. No matter where we live, by February 2, most of us are hoping against hope that Punxsutawney Phil does not see his shadow, thereby shortening our winter by six weeks. Groundhog Day happens at the midway point between winter solstice and spring equinox and may have originally been based on the Christian celebration of Candlemas Day, as a traditional old English Click to Read more…

Saturday, January 23rd

National Compliment Day

  A compliment, small or large, is always welcome. As long as it’s sincerely given, a compliment can turn a bad day around or make a good day even better. Started by Debbie Hoffman and Kathy Chamberlain in 1998, both of New Hampshire, National Compliment Day is a way to share with the people in your life how much you appreciate them. From your sister, who always drops everything at a moment’s notice to babysit, to the bagger at the grocery store who always has a smile for you, there are people in your everyday life who make it better. And perhaps we don’t always show them how much their Click to Read more…

Thursday, January 14th

Ditch New Year’s Resolution Day

Many of us start the new year with good intentions of changing bad habits or adding good ones. From stopping smoking, starting a new diet or exercise program, being more organized, the first blush of the new year brings resolutions to improve our lives. And then … Two weeks in, a piece or two of chocolate cake has somehow snuck onto your plate; you’ve hit the snooze button more than once instead of getting up to go walking; and you’re following smokers around the street, trying to inhale their second-hand smoke. The most common date to give up on your resolutions is January 17. To mark that date, there is Click to Read more…

Thursday, December 31st

Happy New Year’s Day!

Likely the most celebrated holiday in the world, New Year’s Day (January 1), New Year’s Day is typically celebrated with parades, American college football games, European football games, and family time. Food plays an important part in New Year’s Day, with some food taking on a special meaning. Black-eyed peas are a symbol of money — coins, specifically. Greens are also said to be a symbol of money, because of their green color. Pomegranates and grapes stand for prosperity, and figs for fertility. Pigs, being rotund, are considered lucky. Noodles are a symbol of long life, and grains symbolize wealth. Cakes, shaped like a ring, symbolize coming full circle. General Click to Read more…

Thursday, December 24th

Joyous Kwanzaa

Kwanzaa is a week-long celebration of African heritage, first celebrated in 1966, that is observed from December 26 to January 1. According to Maulana Karenga, the creator of the celebration, “Kwanzaa” means “first fruits of the harvest” and is a way for African Americans to connect with their African cultural heritage. Kwanzaa allows participants to respect their traditions, to feel spiritually grounded, to respect their ancestors, connect to the environment, cherish their children, to feel spiritually grounded, and embrace the good of the world. The 7 days of Kwanzaa celebrate 7 principles: December 26 — Umoja (Unity) December 27 — Kujichagulia (Self-Determination) December 28 — Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility) Click to Read more…

Friday, December 18th

Festivus for the Rest of Us!

Festivus is a made-up holiday that gets its origins from the Seinfeld Show. In an episode broadcast in 1997, it’s revealed that George Costanza’s family celebrates Festivus instead of Christmas. In his trademark gravelly voice, George’s father, Frank, explains that the holiday starts with the Airing of Grievances, and ends only when someone is pinned in the Feats of Strength. And, of course, there is the Festivus pole, an undecorated aluminum pole. It remains unadorned because Frank Costanza finds tinsel distracting. Frank invented the holiday as an antidote to the commercialization of Christmas. The story behind the story is that this plot line was not the fruit of the creative Click to Read more…

Monday, December 14th

Baby’s First Christmas – Tips for a Special Season

Sometimes adults forget about the magic of Christmas and focus only on the chores of Christmas, setting a hectic schedule for themselves and missing out on the beauty. For adults, Christmas is about decorating, cooking, and shopping. With all the pressure to make a perfect holiday, it’s easy to forget about the magic of the season. But you only need to look at the face of a child to remember that this is a season of love, joy, and wonderment. New parents can have fun starting Christmas traditions. Maybe these traditions are continuations of their own family’s traditions, or new ones started just for their family. In some families, all Click to Read more…

Wednesday, December 9th

‘Tis Always the Season for Greeting Cards

I’d like to share a personal response to this recent article, “It’s Time to Stop Sending Greeting Cards”. The title alone to me is like the sound of nails on a chalkboard. Yes, it is that time again. We are in the thick of the holiday season frenzy and in addition to gift shopping, it’s Christmas card time. Each year more people are asking themselves if they will even send a holiday card. There are many reasons why this is a growing trend. All reasons certainly having merit. Instead of discounting the reasons not to send Christmas or Season’s Greeting cards or any greeting card for that matter, I will Click to Read more…

Friday, December 4th

Hanukkah, The Festival Of Lights

Hanukkah, also known as the Festival of Lights, lasts for 8 days and is a celebration of light over dark. This year, Hanukkah starts December 6 and ends December 14. The symbols of Hanukkah include menorahs, dreidels, and foil-covered chocolate coins. Hanukkah is commemorated by lighting the candles of a menorah, a 9-armed candelabra. Each night an additional candle is lit. The extra candle, which is used to light the other candles, is called a shamash and is situated in a distinct location on the menorah, either above or below the other candles. After blessings are recited, the candles burn for at least half an hour after darkness falls Dishes Click to Read more…

Monday, November 23rd

Thanksgiving — Missing You

Thanksgiving Day, celebrated in the US on the fourth Thursday in November, is a day of family and friends gathering together for good cheer and fellowship. It is estimated by Waze that 46.3 million Americans will be driving more than 50 miles this Thanksgiving, and Airlines for America predicts that 25.3 million people will travel on U.S. airlines. But some people don’t make it home for Thanksgiving. It might be because of work or school schedules, lack of funds, or military service. For those people, perhaps Skype, FaceTime, or the cellphone is the closest they’ll get to connecting with friends and family. But, whether near or far, we can let Click to Read more…

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